Zoek medewerkers/organisaties dr.ir.ing. GW van Esse
Naam
Naamdr.ir.ing. GW van Esse
RoepnaamWilma
Emailwilma.vanesse@wur.nl

Werk
OmschrijvingExterne medewerker
OrganisatieWageningen Plant Research
OrganisatieeenheidBioscience
Telefoon
Mobiel
Telefoon secretariaat+31 317 480 964
Telefoon 2
Fax
Notitie voor telefonist
Notitie door telefonist
BezoekadresDroevendaalsesteeg 1
6708PB, WAGENINGEN
Gebouw/Kamer107/W1.Ee.093
PostadresPostbus 16
6700AA, WAGENINGEN
Bodenummer53
OmschrijvingOnderzoeker
OrganisatieDepartement Plantenwetenschappen
OrganisatieeenheidLaboratorium voor Moleculaire biologie
Telefoon
Mobiel
Telefoon secretariaat+31 317 482 036
Telefoon 2
Fax
Notitie voor telefonist
Notitie door telefonist
BezoekadresDroevendaalsesteeg 1
6708PB, WAGENINGEN
Gebouw/Kamer107/W1.Ee.093
PostadresPostbus 16
6700AA, WAGENINGEN
Bodenummer53
Reguliere werkdagen
Ma Di Wo Do Vr
Ochtend
Middag

Biografie

Dr. Wilma van Esse is currently project leader on a personal VENI grant and conducts her research on barley plant architecture at Wageningen University and Research (WUR) within the Laboratory of Molecular biology. This VENI project builds on her postdoctoral research conducted in the groups of Prof. Koornneef and Prof. von Korff at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) in Cologne, Germany. Dr. van Esse received both her Ph.D. in Biochemistry and M.Sc. in Biotechnology from WUR and her B.Sc. in Organic Chemistry from the university of applied sciences (HU) in Utrecht.


Expertiseprofiel
Expertise
Sociale media
  Wilma van Esse op Twitter

Publicaties
Kernpublicaties
Publicatielijsten
Onderzoeker ID's

Projecten

VENI: Branching controls yield in barley

Small grain cereals such as barley and wheat are important crop species for food and feed supply. Cereal crop yield depends on traits such as the number of seeds per spike, the number of side shoots (tillers) and seed weight. These traits are often negatively correlated which makes improvement of yield difficult. Recent discoveries indicate that the same genes affect both seed and tiller number. Optimizing yield by changing these traits is possible, but will require an in-depth and fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms that affect both inflorescence and shoot branching. 
The regulation of branching has been well studied in model systems like Arabidopsis and rice. In comparison, little is known about the regulation of branching in small grain cereals such as barley and its close relative wheat. The overall objective of my research is to understand how the same genes or regulatory modules affect both seed and tiller number in barley, an emerging model system for small grain cereals. 

Caption Text
  • mail
  • chat
  • print

Profiel